The Word on I Don't

"Wickedly funny...As we head into the presidential election, you may find yourself channeling Squire as you puzzle out your feelings about the Obama [and] McCain marriages..."--The New York Times Book Review

"...fascinating...valuable insight into an institution that has recently been transformed yet again."--The Boston Globe

"delightful...filled with fascinating tidbits and great scene setters...Squire has a deft touch."--NPR.com

"A captivating chronicle...This withering, sardonic history lesson demonstrates how human events have been shaped by man's insecurity over the fate of his seed."--The New York Observer

"...very amusing....[a] passionate intellectual manifesto."-- Library Journal

"The true history of marriage...Take this potent, hugely entertaining book to bed."-- O, the Oprah Magazine

BOOK OF THE WEEK -- The Week

EDITOR'S CHOICE-- The New York Times Book Review

Author interviews

On Salon.com

In "Happily Never After," Susan talks to Katharine Mieszkowski about why old ideas die hard, and why knowing the history of marriage can help you understand--and maybe live happily ever after in--your own.

The Susan Squire Interview by Claire Zulkey

What forbidden fruit--NOT an apple--did Adam and Eve taste? When did English commoners give up the practice of leashing their wives, leading them to market, and auctioning them off? Read all about it on zulkey.com.

"Crazy Little Things" About Wedlock Past and Present

Sex. Power. Bickering, Anxious husbands. Put-upon wives. The double standard. Getting your man to do the dishes. Elle Magazine's interview with Susan covers the marital waterfront--and then some.

"Susan Squire Takes Matrimony to the Mat"...

...in Playboy's illuminating interview with the author, sampled here: "Q)What's replaced religious authority in the conjugal bed? A)Self-help books, marriage therapists, dreams of romance, and Viagra."

Can Passion Survive Marriage (Or Vice Versa)?

The Huffington Post's Cynthia Kling quizzes the author about such knotty topics as the monotony of monogamy, men's historical fear of women, and the odds of a great love affair translating into a great marriage.